fabriciomora:

Neu12 - Megatabs

(via aleatorydesign)

archatlas:

ehoeho

(Source: thekhooll)

blue-voids:

Guy Sargent - What Lies Beneath the Surface, 2006-09

(via loomingtempest)

homedesigning:

(via Danish Design Win: Sustainable Living )

homedesigning:

(via Danish Design Win: Sustainable Living )

whyallcaps:

KOTONA by BE-FUN

Behind the scenes of ‘Filibuster’

(Source: chrisprattings, via ghostlyre)

archatlas:

Katherine Baxter

"Katherine Baxter’s work is exquisite, whether small or large scale. Meticulous research goes into every ‘jewel’ like piece, and the pleasure she derives from producing these, is communicated to us all. There is complete mastery of the axonometric projection, as can be appreciated in her grand London and New York posters. It is, as if one is transported by hot air balloon, floating gently over all those much loved and beautifully painted landmarks.” David Driver Head of design, The Times

soudasouda:

thecoolhunter_: Many of the trends we are seeing – and liking - in retail, hospitality, services and even urban planning, deal with smaller size because a strong, growing segment of us is tired of Big.
We want small, independent, pop-up, mobile, local, rogue. But – and this is an important but – we want it served up to us in a professional manner, we do not want amateur fumbling even from the smallest providers. In essence, we want what we cannot have from the mega-malls, big boxes, airports, big brands or grocery giants. And that leads to another important ‘but’. We want small BUT we still want the big, too. Nothing new here, but it still seems that many brands, marketers and researchers have a hard time dealing with the fact that we are not black-and-white, either-or. We are both-and, plus a little extra.
You cannot divide consumer habits into age categories or behaviours the way you could a decade or two ago. We are indeed picking and choosing from each basket, and we will continue to do so, but we are choosing small significantly more often than we used to. Read more on thecoolhunter.net “Small is the new Big” pic is from Happy Bones Cafe in NY posted by SoudaSouda

soudasouda:

thecoolhunter_: Many of the trends we are seeing – and liking - in retail, hospitality, services and even urban planning, deal with smaller size because a strong, growing segment of us is tired of Big.

We want small, independent, pop-up, mobile, local, rogue. But – and this is an important but – we want it served up to us in a professional manner, we do not want amateur fumbling even from the smallest providers. In essence, we want what we cannot have from the mega-malls, big boxes, airports, big brands or grocery giants. And that leads to another important ‘but’. We want small BUT we still want the big, too. Nothing new here, but it still seems that many brands, marketers and researchers have a hard time dealing with the fact that we are not black-and-white, either-or. We are both-and, plus a little extra.

You cannot divide consumer habits into age categories or behaviours the way you could a decade or two ago. We are indeed picking and choosing from each basket, and we will continue to do so, but we are choosing small significantly more often than we used to.
Read more on thecoolhunter.net “Small is the new Big” pic is from Happy Bones Cafe in NY posted by SoudaSouda

(via yourhandwritingshouldbecomeafont)

landmarksandfollies:

Marcel Breuer’s Unbuilt 60 State Street, Boston.

The high cost of Breuer’s design led to the cancelling of this tower. Later, SOM designed a building for this site.

(via procrete)

thecitybyeye:

A Spread from my Portfolio, Casa Frischknecht Details - Chris Gaule, Thesis 2014

thecitybyeye:

A Spread from my Portfolio, Casa Frischknecht Details - Chris Gaule, Thesis 2014

(Source: alexxxandro, via ronnelmnop)

Boards don’t hit back.

(Source: communified, via vintagesalt)

jebiga-design-magazine:

Springtime Portable Picnic Table

(via loomingtempest)

(Source: maddierose, via remainsimple)

(Source: linxspiration, via aleatorydesign)